Who’s Reading What This Summer? Episode 5 – Nick DiChario

Episode 5 already? It seems like only yesterday that it was episode 4. Two days ago, tops.

This episode’s star contributor: acclaimed science-fiction novelist Nick DiChario. Nick is the author of two of my favourite sci-fi novels – scratch that, two of my favourite novels, all genres – over the last few years, A Small and Remarkable Life and Valley of Day-Glo.

From Nick’s bio:

I began writing when I was just a kid. I would write and draw my own comic books, make up all the characters and stories, sketch out the panels and color them with crayons. I always wanted to be a writer.
When I graduated college, I began submitting stories to science fiction magazines. One of my first short stories, “The Winterberry,” was nominated for a
Hugo Award and a World Fantasy Award. Since then, I’ve been published in science fiction, fantasy, mystery, and mainstream publications in the United States and abroad, and I’ve been very fortunate to see some of these stories reprinted in The Year’s Best Science Fiction, The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, and The Best Alternate History Stories of the 20th Century, among others.
Since 1992 I’ve taught creative writing workshops for people of all ages and backgrounds at Writers & Books, one of the largest non-profit literary centers in the United States. I have also been a writing professor at St. John Fisher College and the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), and I’ve appeared as a guest lecturer, panelist, speaker, and reader at many schools, seminars, and conventions, including the University of South Florida, the University of Limerick in Ireland, and numerous World Science Fiction Conventions around the world.

And what does this talented writer have in store for himself over the lazy hazy crazy days of summer?

Identity Theft, by Robert J. Sawyer: A short story collection from one of science fiction’s best authors. Sawyer has won the Hugo and Nebula awards and several Aurora’s, among many other honors. He says he’s not going to be writing many more short stories as he concentrates on longer works. This is a hefty collection of 17 very accessible stories that is sure to delight, even if you are not a science fiction reader.

The Silver Swan, by Benjamin Black: If you’re a fan of noir, like me, with angst-ridden protagonists and messy crimes, try Black. This is his second book in the series. You might also want to pick up the first, Christine Falls. The writing is a true pleasure. (Black is the pen name of John Banville, Booker Prize winner in 2005 for the highly-acclaimed novel The Sea.)

When You Are Engulfed in Flames, by David Sedaris: Humorist, satirist, all-around hysterically funny essayist — no one can better pick apart the human condition with such razor-sharp insight and make you laugh harder with black humor. This is a new collection, but if you’ve never had the pleasure of reading Sedaris, pick up everything you can get your hands on!

Shelf Monkey, by Corey Redekop: This is NOT shameless promotion! How can a book-lover resist a book about books? I had a chance to meet Corey at the Canadian Book Expo in Toronto earlier this year, and I’m looking forward to reading his award-winning novel (Gold Medal for Best Popular Fiction Novel at the 2008 Independent Publisher Book Awards).

Thanks, Nick, and your cheque is in the mail!